Vacation In Calabria Italy

Vacation In Calabria Italy offers accommodations in Kiris and is located 25 miles from Lamezia Terme. The property is 42 miles from Bivongi and free private parking is featured. The unit is 22 miles from Cosenza and free WiFi is provided throughout the property.

Vacation In Calabria Italy is a website, which provides complete and valid information regarding Holiday Rentals in South Italy including Villa Rental, Apartment Rental, Summer vacation Rental and Short Term Rentals.

The Italian state of Calabria is a relatively small region located in the foot-hills of the Italian mainland. The province, which includes the Pollino massif, is one of the largest in Italy and is home to rich marine life, unique wildlife, vast forests and impressive landscapes that span from lush coastlines to sparkling bays and sandy coves. This stunning part of southern Italy is rich in history, culture and natural beauty and offers guests a wide variety of exciting things to do and see. Whether you’re looking for an adventure to remain engraved on your memory forever or hoping to spend quality time with your loved ones then a vacation in Calabria Italy is just what you need.

Vacation In Calabria Italy

Due to its easy access and domestic tourism, the city of Lamezia Terme has managed to become a central hub for visitors from all over Italy, particularly from the north. There are many features that make this city one of the most elegant and welcoming, like the wide range of accommodations, bed and breakfasts, hotels, campsites, and agriturismo farms. If you are looking for fun activities during your vacation in Italy or want to enjoy an amazing stay at the beach, there are a number of amazing things to do in Lamezia Terme.

14 Reasons Calabria Needs to Be Your Next Italy Vacation

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By Michelle Fabio

Calabria, the toe of Italy’s boot, is unfairly one of the country’s lesser-known regions among Americans, but it’s long been popular with Europeans, especially for its stunning 500 miles of coastline. Beyond beaches, this ancient land between two seas—the Ionian and Tyrrhenian—offers additional natural splendors including three national parks with towering mountains, lakes, waterfalls, and gorges, as well as countless rolling hills lined with olive trees.

Once known as Magna Graecia (that’s “Great Greece” in Latin) for the Greek settlements on these shores thousands of years ago, Calabria counts among its former rulers the Germans, French, Spanish, Turks, Austrians, and Bourbons, all of whom have influenced the area’s architecture, dialect, customs, and cuisine. So whether you want a relaxing beach holiday, an outdoor adventure, adorable medieval villages, or centuries-old artifacts from many cultures and traditions, there’s something for you in Calabria.

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Tropea

By Norbert Nagel (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Tropea

Tropea, on the Tyrrhenian Sea, is Calabria’s crowning jewel. Dramatic rock formations, clean beaches, and crystalline water reminiscent of tropical islands are the main draws—understandably—but the charming, pedestrian-only historical center, with its restaurants, cafes, and shops, is an added bonus.

And then there are the famous red onions, which you’ll find hanging all over the place and in every restaurant, prepared in various ways, including a sweet marmalade—a true flavor of Calabria. Santa Maria dell’Isola, a Benedictine sanctuary that sits at the top of 300 steps (pictured above), is Tropea’s most famous landmark and well worth the climb for the incredible views across the Strait of Messina to the Aeolian Islands and Stromboli.

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Chiesetta di Piedigrotta

Polpettinablu (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Chiesetta di Piedigrotta

As its name suggests in Italian, Chiesetta di Piedigrotta is a little church in a cave. Located near the beach on the Tyrrhenian in the community of Pizzo Calabro, the church has an interior that was carved entirely from tufa limestone. In the 17th century, a group of Neapolitan sailors prayed to the Virgin Mary during a terrible storm and promised to build her a church if they survived. When they washed up alive on the shores of Pizzo, they followed through. Over the years, other sculptors have expanded upon their work, carving out several altars, biblical scenes, and even depictions of Pope John Paul II and John F. Kennedy.

Pizzo is also famous for tartufo, a ball of hazelnut gelato filled with melted chocolate and dusted in chocolate powder.

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Le Castella

Revol Web/ Flickr

Le Castella

Le Castella is a 15th-century Aragonese fortress that appears to float on its own island in the municipality of Isola di Capo Rizzuto. Visitors can climb to the top of the castle, as they go peeking out the “bocca di lupo” (wolf’s mouth) windows, which were once used for spotting approaching enemies.

Italy’s largest protected marine area, extending from Capo Colonna to Isola di Capo Rizzuto, is a particularly inviting stretch of the Ionian Coast featuring stony coral reefs and lots of marine life, especially seahorses and dolphins. You could spend a few days exploring water-related pursuits such as transparent-bottom boat trips, mini cruises, diving, snorkeling, and simply soaking up some rays on the beaches.

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Torre Camigliati

Torre Camigliati

Torre Camigliati

Camigliatello Silano in northern Calabria is a perfect home base for exploring the Sila National Park, including La Nave della Sila, a museum dedicated to Calabrian emigration. Within the confines of this charming but often bustling village is an oasis: Torre Camigliati, a fully restored 18th-century baronial hunting lodge located on a private, wooded, 200-acre estate (pictured above). At Torre Camigliati, you can stay in one of 12 guest rooms on the upper floor of the lodge or in six independent apartments. The spot is immersed in nature and is one of Calabria’s most popular skiing locations.

On the grounds you’ll also find the Parco Old Calabria, named after a 1915 travelogue written by British author Norman Douglas. The green space is classified as a “parco letterario,” or literary park, for its inspirational value to wordsmiths and other artists.

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Reggio Calabria

Luca Galli (CC BY 2.0)/Wikimedia Commons

Reggio Calabria

Just a hop over the Strait of Messina from Sicily, Reggio Calabria was rebuilt after a 1908 earthquake, giving it a more modern look than most Italian cities. Its Lungomare Falcomatà promenade (pictured above) may or may not actually have been called “the most beautiful kilometer in Italy” by author Gabriele D’Annunzio, but it’s indisputably gorgeous, lined with palm trees and Art Nouveau palazzi such as Spinelli, Giuffré, and Zani and with views across the water to Mount Etna.

The Arena dello Stretto, an ancient Greek-style theatre, hosts events throughout the summer, and don’t miss the Riace Bronzes in the Museo Nazionale della Magna Graecia. These lifelike, 5th-century Greek warriors were rescued from the Ionian in 1972; photographs do not do justice to their intricate details such as silver teeth and glass and ivory eyes.

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